👽A science-fiction reading at Jinxed West Philly location featuring @metropolarity co-founders Alex Smith and M Eighteen Téllez, as well as Sarah Sawyers-Lovett and Moose Lane!

👽A science-fiction reading at Jinxed West Philly location featuring @metropolarity co-founders Alex Smith and M Eighteen Téllez, as well as Sarah Sawyers-Lovett and Moose Lane!

A SCIFI/SPECULATIVE STORYTELLING & DISCUSSION SERIES

FEATURING

ORIGINAL WRITING +
BELOVED SLEPT-ON TALES +
ATMOSPHERIC AUDIO ACCOMPANIMENT +
RELATED DISCUSSION

WITH YOUR CYBORG HOST, magus monk (b.k.a. eighteen)
AND SPECIAL GUEST NEIGHBORS FROM TIME 2 TIME

///EPISODE #00

Eighteen introduces the listener to this new series and then waxes on at length about the slept-on feminist sci-fi short story writer, James Tiptree Jr/Alice B Sheldon.

From 21:43 begins the dramatic reading of Tiptree/Sheldon’s grim tale of rising facist men’s cult, The Screwfly Solution, featuring musical accompaniment by the spacer, @starsinmypockets.

CONTENT WARNING: sexualized violence & assault of women (part of the story’s riding theme), suicide

///EPISODE #01

Ras Mashramani reads her story GRL.SUICIDE.HOLIDAY from METROPOLARITY’s debut book, Style of Attack Report.

Audio accompaniment done live by Althea of SWARM & Bare TeetH collectives.

After the story, Ras and Eighteen hang out and talk about
social space and the early internet + video games/interactive narratives and mental health coping techniques + social work programs + institutions + getting published + using the 2nd person + working writer pro tips

and other ish. =)

Mentioned in the cast:
Thomas Ligotti
our temporary supervisor – https://libcom.org/library/our-tempor…
the town manager – http://www.theshortform.com/story/the…
the red tower – http://weirdfictionreview.com/2011/12…

procyon 2016 sci-fi anthology: http://bit.ly/2lzg3Iy
poc destroy sci-fi: http://www.destroysf.com/
stories for chip – http://bit.ly/2khFOgb

///FUTURE EPISODES

Check back or subscribe to DHDcast at https://www.mixcloud.com/DHDcast/desire.

AND IN OUR FOURTH YEAR WE PRODUCED A BOOK

“…an unprecedentedly rich source for…current and relevant” science fiction

METROPOLARITY is a DIY sci-fi collective based, bred, and tested in the colliding future-present of Philadelphia. This Style of Attack Report contains select work from Metropolarity’s four founding members, who contribute theory, practice, and experience of home grown speculative visioning for both historical documentation as well as personal and collective survival. The collection serves as a model and a record of how Black, brown, queer, low-resource, working, ill and in-recovery people can project themselves into the future, conjuring resources, technology, and magic that aid us in the present.

Also this sci-fi is FIRE cuz the crew don’t play.

120 pages
4.25″ x 7″

METROPOLARITY: The manifestation of contrasting principles, tendencies, or lifestyles in an urban system and any reactions resulting from encounters between these forces.

$13 USD IRL
$15 USD, free shipping in US, int’l +$

AVAILABLE ONLINE HERE & HERE

Request a copy at your local library.
Add it to your Goodreads here.
Ask a favorite book store to get it in stock.
For wholesale & bulk order inquiries, email metropolarity @ gmail.com

overhead view of front and back cover of METROPOLARITY'S Style of Attack Report paperback sitting on a tablecloth with abstracted QR code pattern

back cover of METROPOLARITY'S Style of Attack Report resting on top of dirty white bag in a trolley car

iew of METROPOLARITY'S Style of Attack Report from side so that spine text saying the same is visible

animated gif of STYLE OF ATTACK REPORT showing inside contents

COME GET YOUR SPECULATIVE VISION STRONG WITH ALEX & EIGHTEEN, READING AT THE LAUNCH JAWN 4 YOU~

Tomorrow Never Happens Semester Launch Party
Friday, September 16, 7pm
Samek Gallery, 3rd Floor Elaine Langone Center

This exhibition explores queer futurity and the aesthetics of utopia.

From marriage equality, to “bathroom bills,” to the massacre in Orlando, queerness is central to current social and political life. Current events can mire us in an unrelenting present that makes it hard to imagine a path beyond.

A rising chorus of artists is asking where do we go from here? How do queer communities imagine and work toward a better world? And how do queer theories, artistic practices, and lived experiences influence broader cultural thinking about the future?

The artworks in this exhibition represent a diverse range of sexes and sexualities, gender identities and expressions, national origins, and aesthetic sensibilities. Each work speaks with its own voice and they point down many possible paths to queer futurity. In some works, sexuality and sexual imagery are exposed as politics. Some works invoke collective strength and a sense of shared destiny. And others code utopian messages into history, mythology, and culture. Together, they suggest that our best hope may be to queer the future.

Join us to celebrate Tomorrow Never Happens and the beginning of a new semester. Featuring  hip hop, drag, and  spoken word performances from
Abdu Ali, Lil Miss Hot Mess, as well as Maggie Eighteen and Alex Smith of Metropolarity
.

Kelly Writers House invites you to join a new
Writing Group for Trans
& Gender Non-Conforming Youth

This monthly writing group is open and free of charge for youth ages 14–22 who identify as transgender or gender non-conforming (GNC). The group will meet monthly at Kelly Writers House on the University of Pennsylvania campus on the second Saturday of the month, 12:00–2:00pm. No experience or expertise in writing is expected. Trans and GNC-identified guest writers will lead the group each month, and trans and GNC-identified facilitators will attend and support all monthly sessions. Lunch will be provided, as well as SEPTA tokens for transportation to and from the group. Come join us!

Kelly Writers House invites you to join a new

Writing Group for Trans
& Gender Non-Conforming Youth

 This monthly writing group is open and free of charge for youth ages 14–22 who identify as transgender or gender non-conforming (GNC). The group will meet monthly at Kelly Writers House on the University of Pennsylvania campus on the second Saturday of the month, 12:00–2:00pm. No experience or expertise in writing is expected. Trans and GNC-identified guest writers will lead the group each month, and trans and GNC-identified facilitators will attend and support all monthly sessions. Lunch will be provided, as well as SEPTA tokens for transportation to and from the group. Come join us!

 

September 10 – Andrew Spiers, Kalen McLean and Hazel Edwards, facilitators

Come meet and start writing with the three trans and GNC-identified people who will facilitate the writing group and help establish ground rules and brainstorm topics participants want to write about. Andrew Spiers is a trans/queer writer, musician, and radical social worker. Kalen McLean works at the Mazzoni Center and helps facilitate a support group for young trans and GNC youth. Hazel Edwards is an artist, trans activist, and member of the Justice League at the Attic’s Bryson Center.

 

October 8, 2016 – Guest Writer Kavi Ade

Kavindu “Kavi” Ade is a writer, activist, arts educator, and nationally recognized spoken word poet. While best known for their gender identity poem titled “IT,” Kavi’s work most often bridges the realms of personal and political identity – navigating what it means to be Black, Transgender, Queer, and first-generation American all at once. Through their poetry the world unfolds itself in moments of cruelty, rage, and grief, but also beauty, wonder, and becoming.

 

November 12, 2016 – Guest Writers Mel Bentley and Leah B.

Mel Bentley co-organizes Housework at Chapterhouse, a reading series in Center City. They have two chapbooks published from 89plus/Luma Foundation and Lamehouse Press. Leah B. (Ksenya Leah Basarab) creates experimental musical fragments and prose/narrative/essay-form written works. Her musical pieces are an energized form of communication that involves sharing a myriad of emotions, memories, and opinions via varying vocalizations, a bass guitar, timing effects/layers, sometimes a piano, and more rarely a cello.

 

December 10, 2016 – Guest Writer M Eighteen Téllez

A founding member of the METROPOLARITY sci-fi collective, Eighteen is a hybrid mestiza cyborg and Philadelphia native who is frustrated/pissed with institutional distinction, empire and white supremacy, and fixed rather than fluid treatment of language and identity. They consider the spoken and written word handy and inexpensive tools for deconstructing oppressive world-ordering narratives.

 

January 14, 2017 – Guest Writer Cyree Jarelle Johnson

Cyree Jarelle Johnson is a Black non-binary essayist and poet living and working in Philadelphia. Their writing considers disability as a cyborg femme reality, femininity as resistance and rebellion, and Black pessimism. They are a founding member of A Collective Apparition, a Black queer and trans interdisciplinary arts collective. Their work has been featured in publications both domestically and internationally including Black Girl Dangerous, Feministing, and in the anthology Poems for the Queer Revolution.

 

February 11, 2017 – Guest Writer Trish Salah

Trish Salah is a Lebanese/Irish-Canadian feminist writer and educator whose writing addresses trans themes as well as questions of diasporic Arab identity, anti-racism, queer politics and economic and social justice. Her first volume of poetry, Wanting in Arabic, published in 2002 then reissued, won the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Fiction in 2014. Roof Books published her second book, Lyric Sexology Vol. 1, in 2014.

 

March 11, 2017 – Guest Writer Davy Knittle

Davy Knittle is a poet whose chapbooks include empathy for cars / force of july (horse less press) and cyclorama (the operating system). He is a PhD candidate in English at Penn, where he thinks about what cities and poetry have to say to each other, and how poetry might help cities make room for everyone who lives in them.

 

April 8, 2017 – End-of-year party and chapbook launch

We will have an end-of-year celebration at Kelly Writers House where the youth can share their writing with friends and family.

 

Sessions will take place at Kelly Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk, on the University of Pennsylvania campus, except on October 8 and March 11, when the writing group will be held at the LGBT Center at Penn, 3907 Spruce Street. Questions? Please contact Amy Hillier at ahillier@upenn.edu or Andrew Spiers at andrewspiersmss@gmail.com or Rachel Zolf at zolfr@writing.upenn.edu. Funding for the writing group is provided by Kelly Writers House and the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy & Practice.

 

 

“SCI-FI AS MEMOIR IN THE REALITY OF APOCALYPSE”

(1) #SOFTTARGETS WAS A DAY OF WRITING CRITIQUES + WORKSHOPS + PERFORMANCES ON A SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT THE PHILADELPHIA FREE LIBRARY CENTRAL BRANCH.

This was an day-long event held in preparation for the submission deadline to APIARY Magazine’s 8th issue and collaboration with our collective, themed SOFT TARGETS. APIARY is a volunteer-run, freely distributed literary magazine based in and featuring Philadelphia writers. Before METROPOLARITY got started, Ras was one of the fiction editors for the mag. APIARY’s staff has always supported us, and we’ve been meaning to do some sort of collaborative effort ever since. So the SOFT TARGETS issue is a sci-fi one collaboratively edited by us at METROPOLARITY, along with the standing editors at APIARY.

THE DAY CONCLUDED WITH METROPOLARITY SQUAD READING IN THE MAIN BRANCH’S FAMOUS AUDITORIUM. IF YOU MISSED IT, THANK THE COSMOS FOR A LIVESTREAM, M I RITE???? AUDIO IS PROVIDED BY NYFOLT & MOOR MOTHER GODDESS/BLACK QUANTUM FUTURISM CREW

Eighteen says: It was sooooooooooo nice to be at the central branch of the library for this event, and super starry to perform in the famed auditorium. Like a lot of Philadelphians out there, I spent a looot of time in the library growing up (Olney & East Oak Lane branches whut up). Really grateful to APIARY staff and Adam from the Library for making things possible, and very appreciative of everyone who came out to the writing critique session and workshop, and all those who stayed for the performances.

(2) THE LASER LIFE QUEER SCI-FI READING SERIES MARCH EDITION WAS FIRE

ALEX SMITH READS AT LASER LIFE

THE LASER LIFE AT LAVA ZONE
HASHTAG QUEER SCI-FI HASHTAG FUCK GOD HASHTAG FUCK LANDOWNERS HASHTAG UP THE HERETICS
#METROPOLARITY

THANKS TO ALL WHO CAME. THANKS TO JOYCE HATTON FOR THE MOST EXCELLENT DEBUT, MOOR MOTHER GODDESS FOR THE STORM, CHASKA FOR THE PERFECT AUDIO/VISUAL ATMOSPHERE & EVERYONE WHO CAME OUT <3 <3 <3 <3 IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN READING/PERFORMING AT THE NEXT LASER LIFE, CONTACT THEYAREBIRDS AT GEEEEEMAIL.

What nobody seems to have pics of is the powerful trailer for M. Asli Dukan‘s INVISIBLE UNIVERSE documentary on black speculative fiction… but check this out:

INVISIBLE UNIVERSE DOCUMENTARY (FUNDRAISING DEMO) from MIZAN MEDIA PRODUCTIONS on Vimeo.

In 2003, independent filmmaker, M. Asli Dukan, set out to make a documentary about the 150 year history of Black creators in speculative fiction (SF) books and movies. What she didn’t realize at the time was that she was about to document a major movement in the history of speculative fiction. A movement where a growing number of Black creators were becoming an effective force, creating works that had increasing influence on the traditionally, straight, white, cis-male dominated SF industry. However, while these Black creators imagined better futures for Black people within their fictional works of SF, in reality, the everyday, lived experiences of Black people in the United States – e.g., the rise of massive inequality, the prison industrial complex, and police brutality – stood in stark contrast. She began to wonder if these phenomena were related.

Told through the ever-present lens and off-screen narrator voice of the filmmaker, Invisible Universe will explore this question by examining the work of Black creators of SF through the ideology of the emerging Black Lives Matter movement, which addresses the systematic oppression of Black lives. Since she began the documentary, the filmmaker has compiled an extensive interviewee list of Black writers, artists and filmmakers of SF who have been creating works where Black people not only exist in the future, but are powerful shapers of their own realities, whether in magical lands, dystopian settings, or on distant worlds. In addition, she has documented an ever-increasing number of academic, community and arts events dedicated to the work and critical analysis of Black SF, as well as building connections between the creators, thinkers, organizers and fans. In the past decade, the filmmaker has documented the cultural shift around Black SF and its explicit connections to Black liberation. This documentary explores the idea that in a world of capitalist exploitation, anti-Black oppression and state violence, Black creators are speculating about better worlds as a means of resistance and survival.

The documentary will also consider how “Black Speculation” is rooted in the history of “Black Struggle” in the United States by exploring two previous eras of Black creators speculating about Black lives through the genres of SF. The first era occurred during the nadir of African American history in late 19th and early 20th centuries, when slavery, war, lynchings, race riots, disfranchisement and segregation inspired Black writers to pen narratives about international slave rebellions, secret, Black governments and powerful, long lost, African kingdoms. The second era occurred during the 1960’s and early 1970’s, when the work of Black writers of SF seemed to extrapolate on the possible futures that would occur as a result of the successes or failures of the Civil Rights or Black Power struggles. This documentary will explore how this current moment, which the filmmaker considers the third era of Black Speculation, compares and contrasts with the earlier two eras.

This timely documentary includes interviews with Black writers of SF like Samuel R. Delany, the late Octavia E. Butler, Steven Barnes, Tananarive Due, Nalo Hopkinson and Nnedi Okorafor, actors like Nichelle Nichols and Wesley Snipes, cultural organizers like Rasheedah Phillips and her AfroFuturist Affair, academics/artists like John Jennings and Nettrice Gaskins, social justice workers/artists like adrienne maree brown and Walidah Imarisha, as well as numerous other filmmakers, artists, academics, archivists, and fans. This one-of-a-kind project is essentially an archive of a “Who’s Who” of Black speculative fiction.

Ras, Eighteen, maybe Alex too, will be on hand at this week’s Comma Talk:

Curated & hosted by Maryan Captan, comma talk is a discussion-based and audience interactive reading series featuring Philadelphia’s emerging writers and poets. With a goal of exploring and discussing creative process, themes, and techniques used in the featured writers’ work, Comma Talk is about connecting the writing to the writer.

The artist Sondra Perry hit us up one day with a collab idea: We write/record a critical writing component to go along with her project, #MyTwilightZoneThing, taking place at Recess Art in New York. A couple weeks later…

We had the great fortune to commission the critical writing for #MyTwilightZoneThing to METROPOLARITY, a collective of speculative fiction writers/artists/activists based/raised in Philadelphia. Their contribution “YOU HAVE 4 MESSAGES” includes 4 texts [and 3 audio pieces] written by RAS MASHRAMANI (@anti_gyal), Alex Smith (@theyarebirds), M. EIGHTEEN (@cyborgmemoirs), and Rasheedah Phillips (@afrofuturistaffair).
It’s incredible.

My Twilight Zone Thing builds upon the artist’s belief that the original show dismantles whiteness through the lens of science fiction. Although each episode of The Twilight Zone opens with the narrator (series creator Rod Serling) describing the mostly male, primarily white characters, these individuals go on to enter an alternate plane—a move that complicates the viewer’s ingrained ways of seeing and coding the characters’ physical realities.

Perry posits that the way in which the show scrambles assumptions around the characters’ bodies gives rise to multiple new possibilities for seeing and understanding their personhood. Perry will work with the collaborators to experiment with this dissolution of identity as they insert themselves into these narrated scenes. With only the original script remaining as a point of reference to the source material, the actors will have the opportunity to assume, mimic, or defy the externally prescribed characteristics, thereby taking advantage of the rift between representative structures and real bodies.

Download your copy at the link below!
http://www.recessart.org/metropolarity-you-have-4-messages/ (at Recess)

Or visit map to Recess Gallery in New York to grab a limited USB drive loaded with the goods + other tasty media morsels

–>TODDLERS ON TOUCHSCREENS CAUSE THEIR FINGERS WAS BORN WITH IT — DRONE SURVEILLANCE OVER ALL YR BODEGAS — SUPERBACTERIA TALKIN BOUT FUCK YR PENICILLIN — SCI FI IS NO LONGER ONLY FOR THE FUTURE — SCI FI IS HERE ON YOUR FRONT PORCH — WE WANT YOUR FUTURE PRESENT — YOUR SCI FI REALITIES — THE FUTURE IS NOW <--

link to download METROPOLARITY FUTURE NOW ZINE SINGLE PAGE SCREEN FORMAT link to download METROPOLARITY FUTURE NOW ZINE DOUBLE SIDED PRINT FORMAT

COLLAB ZINE W/ WORK FROM::::::::::
+ IT IS OKAY by Laura Pollard
+ SPONSORED MESSAGES from grey nebraska
+ comments from Azeem Hill, Fred Pinguel, n Carolyn Lazard
+ BATTLEFIELD REPLICA SYMMETRY RETROSPECTA by Moor Mother Goddess
+ THE 40TH ST. CON by Skribbly LaCroix
+ CONSTANTEMIEDOCONSTANTE by Natis
+ DISTRICTS by Aja Beech
+ FLYBOYS by Billie Blazer
+ G.P.S. by Althea Baird

+ LIFE ONLINE WORKSHEET by Eighteen & Ras
+ PORTRAIT OF THE ACTIVIST AS A YOUNG SUPER-HERO by Alex Smith
+ BLACK QUANTUM FUTURISM by Rasheedah Phillips
+ A YOUNG THUG CONFRONTS HIS OWN FUTURE by Ras Mashramani

Released in October of 2014 with work from Philly-based and Philly-born residents.
The print format of this zine is an 11″ x 17″ dimension printed on 8.5″ x 11″ size paper and trimmed by 0.5″ on the edges.
Print for your own pleasure but we request that anyone looking to distribute this zine contact us to ask & discuss first. Email metropolarity @ gmail dot com.

Ya’ll are some fools! I’m yelling and gnashing my teeth and screeching at them in modified Common to pay attention. But these gentry don’t know what the fuck I’m talking about. You know that? Then they get robbed and laughed at and their goddamn feelings hurt cause they wanna talk to me and I tell them their Common ain’t shit — nobody can understand what the fuck they talking about! Don’t come to this end of the city like you know what this place is! But they come anyway.

Don’t you know? One time in ancient history someone came up with the idea that says, to fool and become an important human being you first must be white; secondly — totally understanding; third — never totally actually directly responsible (accept this); and fourth — that you will move through space outside of history (just like an astronaut!) and come to truly know yourself only by trying out other people’s cultures.

Except if you can’t fucking speak Common, how the fuck . . .

I don’t get it either, and they think I’m like them, and then they get Sensitive when I’m like that’s not how you use Jawn and that’s not what Salty means here, and that’s not how you act on the train, and you never heard of Belmont Plateau? You been living here for ten years five years three years you never heard of that place?

All these young white punks fresh from college and suburbia, responsible young moms as far as the eye can see, touring upper class parents here to survey the neighborhood — YOU KNOW SOMETHING? UPENN THROWS DOWN HALF ON A HOUSE IN WEST PHILLY IF YOU WORK FOR THEM? SO HOW CAN I GET A JOB? Gentry keeps coming in, crawling over Malcolm X Park and the block of Osage the city bombed to the ground, and nobody has any memory and everything is so charming, and they don’t even know we’re here and don’t even care! Cause they don’t know Common? BUT IT DOESN’T MATTER CAUSE THEY THINK THEY DO!!

You know, I never lived in a place that was gentry-fied before. I was living out by 48th and Baltimore down the street from my aunt. They call that area Middle Hill now and my aunt stays holed up with her cat in her Victorian rowhome with her Classic Olde Philly accent (the only one the realtors recognize, anyway) looking at her property taxes like she don’t know what she’s gonna have to do. And I moved back to Olney, out by the empty fields where the HK Mart used to be, and the abandoned middle school at Godfrey . . . Live by my parents finally — my stepdad’s got a grill, my mom’s got a little library going, and my little brother, he builds stuff that keeps things DRY. You know they say Levittown is a swamp now? That and the whole shit by Cobbs Creek — lotta places. It’s from the overflowed rivers and all the old backed up drainage systems in the city, and they only send out the truancy officers to those parts, rounding up all those badassed lazy kids and throwing them in detention schools, which YOU KNOW, are the only kinds of free schools this city GOT anymore, and my nana woulda been pissed to have her taxes go to those nasty kids! But what she doesn’t know is that we’re all living with the possums and raccoons now, and those loudass coquís. Her basement’s been flooded and her house is falling down empty.

And me, I go to work downtown for this young gay PhD couple taking car of their dogs. They work at the experimental charter school district — not the Penn one, the other one sponsored by PEW down by the Delaware. You know, the Delaware’s off limits, too. Might as well call it the Columbus River, if you hear what I’m saying, and let us merry men stick to our trashy creeks up the way . . .

And we’ll keep speaking in Common and remember the old blocks and these fools will stay making some other city on top of ours. Cause they don’t know that we’re here, and they don’t fucking care.

 

GENTRY was recently performed for LIVE at Kelly Writer’s House (available to listen here), and originally appeared in the space invaders edition of the Metropolarity Journal of Speculative Vision & Critical Liberation Technologies (available 4 free here). It was also assigned reading in a University of Pennsylvania undergraduate English department class, but Eighteen, who lives blocks away from campus, was not present to give any context to the piece whatsoever.

Enjoy the literary side of science with writers Tamara Oakman, Grant Clauser, Chris McCreary, Bryan Dickey, Rasheedah Phillips, Kathryn Ionata, Kyrwin Sutherland, Matt Charles, and Maggie Eighteen selected by The Apiary Corp., Bedfellows, Philadelphia Stories, Gigantic Sequins, Cleaver Magazine, Thread Makes Blanket, Painted Bride Quarterly, The AfroFuturist Affair, Metropolarity and Fact-Simile Editions.

Writers respond to the prompt “What’s the Science?” to describe how they imagine (or prefer to imagine) various phenomena occur, collaboratively creating a new cosmology. From sweaty suns to train rainbows, you’re sure to delight in this new world.

Suggested donation $7-10

Read bios of the participants at length here: https://www.facebook.com/events/472004649618093

Enjoy the literary side of science with writers Tamara Oakman, Grant Clauser, Chris McCreary, Bryan Dickey, Rasheedah Phillips, Kathryn Ionata, Kyrwin Sutherland, Matt Charles, and Maggie Eighteen selected by The Apiary Corp., Bedfellows, Philadelphia Stories, Gigantic Sequins, Cleaver Magazine, Thread Makes Blanket, Painted Bride Quarterly, The AfroFuturist Affair, Metropolarity and Fact-Simile Editions.

Writers respond to the prompt “What’s the Science?” to describe how they imagine (or prefer to imagine) various phenomena occur, collaboratively creating a new cosmology. From sweaty suns to train rainbows, you’re sure to delight in this new world.

Suggested donation $7-10

Read bios of the participants at length here: https://www.facebook.com/events/472004649618093

spring forward into your less than gradual death with local trans poets & writers:

Maggie Eighteen of Metropolarity
Hayden Elizabeth
Die Dragonetti
Amarah Selaphiel
Grey Nebraska

spring forward into your less than gradual death with local trans poets & writers:

Maggie Eighteen of Metropolarity
Hayden Elizabeth
Die Dragonetti
Amarah Selaphiel
Grey Nebraska